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  • Writer's pictureTristan Larson

Dividing Money, Property, and Stuff


Divorce can be a difficult and emotional time for all involved parties. One of the most important aspects of a divorce is the division of assets and property. Each state has its own laws and guidelines for how assets and property are divided during a divorce. In Vermont, the process of dividing money and property during a divorce is determined by the state's laws and guidelines.

Vermont is an "equitable distribution" state, which means that marital property is divided in a way that is fair and equitable, but not necessarily equal. This means that assets and property are divided based on several factors, including the length of the marriage, the contribution of each spouse to the acquisition of property, and the financial needs of each spouse after the divorce.

Marital property is any property that was acquired by either spouse during the marriage, regardless of whose name is on the title. This can include real estate, bank accounts, retirement accounts, and other assets. Non-marital property, on the other hand, is property that was acquired before the marriage or after the date of separation. Non-marital property is not subject to division during a divorce.


When dividing marital property, the court considers several factors, including the contribution of each spouse to the acquisition of property, the length of the marriage, the financial needs of each spouse, and the value of each spouse's non-marital property. The court may also consider the age, health, and earning capacity of each spouse, as well as any other relevant factors.


In Vermont, the court has broad discretion to divide marital property in a way that is fair and equitable. This means that the court may divide property in a way that is not equal, but that takes into account the specific circumstances of the case. For example, the court may award one spouse a larger share of the marital property if that spouse has a greater financial need or made a larger contribution to the acquisition of property during the marriage.


In addition to dividing property, the court may also award spousal support, also known as alimony, to one spouse. Spousal support is typically awarded to a spouse who is financially dependent on the other spouse and needs support to maintain their standard of living after the divorce. The amount and duration of spousal support are determined by the court based on several factors, including the length of the marriage, the financial needs of each spouse, and the earning capacity of each spouse.

In conclusion, divorces in Vermont are decided based on the state's laws and guidelines for dividing property and assets. The court considers several factors, including the length of the marriage, the contribution of each spouse to the acquisition of property, and the financial needs of each spouse after the divorce. The court has broad discretion to divide property in a way that is fair and equitable, but not necessarily equal. Spousal support may also be awarded to a financially dependent spouse to help them maintain their standard of living after the divorce.

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